Eschrichtius robustus

gray whale
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Classification
Mammalia | Cetacea | Eschrichtiidae
Common names | Synonyms | CoL | ITIS | WoRMS

Main reference
. . (Ref. 1394)
References | Biblio | Coordinator | Collaborators

Size / Weight / Age
Max length : 1,500 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 1394); max. published weight: 35.0 t (Ref. 1394)

Environment
Pelagic; oceanodromous (Ref. 75906); depth range 1 - 2500 m, usually 30 - 500 m

Climate / Range
Tropical; 90°N - 0°S, 115°E - 105°W

Distribution
Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Ocean: Extinct in North Atlantic; two populations in North Pacific. [western population: IUCN 2010 (Ref. 84930): CR, C2a(ii);E.]
Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Lives within a few tens of kilometers of shore. Bottom feeders that feed primarily on swarming mysids and tube-dwelling amphipods in the northern parts of their range, but are also known to take red crabs, baitfish, and other food opportunistically. The North Atlantic stock was apparently wiped-out by whalers in the 18th century. A western North Pacific (Korean) stock may also have been extirpated in the mid 20th century; its continued existence as a small remnant is still debated. The eastern North Pacific (California-Chukotka) stock nearly suffered the same fate twice, once in the late 1800s and again in the early 1900s. Both times, a respite in commercial whaling allowed the population to recover. About 170 to 200 from this latter stock are killed annually under special permit by commercial whalers on behalf of Soviet aborigines, and one or a few are taken in some years by Alaskan Eskimos. Since receiving IWC protection in 1946 and the end of research harvests in the late 1960s this population has increased, and now apparently equals or exceeds pre-exploitation numbers (Ref. 1394). Lives within a few tens of kilometers of shore. Bottom feeders that feed primarily on swarming mysids and tube-dwelling amphipods in the northern parts of their range, but are also known to take red crabs, baitfish, and other food opportunistically (Ref. 1394). Common birth length: 480 cm (Ref. 75906).

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 96402)

CITES status (Ref. 94142)

Threat to humans




Human uses
Fisheries: commercial
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More information

Common names
Synonyms
Predators
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Eggs
Egg development
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Morphology
Larvae
Abundance
References
Mass conversion

Internet sources
BHL | BOLD Systems | Check for other websites | Check FishWatcher | CISTI | DiscoverLife | FAO(Publication : search) | GenBank (genome, nucleotide) | GOBASE | Google Books | Google Scholar | Google | ispecies | National databases | PubMed | Scirus | Sea Around Us | FishBase | Tree of Life | uBio | uBio RSS | Wikipedia (Go, Search) | Zoological Record

Estimation of some characteristics with mathematical models

Vulnerability (Ref. 71543)
High vulnerability (56 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown